Book Review: Aspiring Daybook, by Annabel Wilson

Originally reviewed for Booksellers NZ, reprinted in ‘English in Aotearoa, Issue 96, May 2019

In Aspiring Daybook by Annabel Wilson,  Elsie Winslow returns home to live with her father, Simon, and help care for her terminally ill brother, Sam.  Her former lover Frank lives nearby. We share in Elsie’s life for a year through this book, her diary, which includes poems, yes, and also photographs, facebook chats, emails and newspaper clippings.  This is what Elsie chooses to record from her day, her month, her year. This structure means the reader is glimpsing small moments, gathering up character and events but has to let them go, not knowing how they might return.

Because of the form, Wilson’s characters, and perhaps most importantly their relationships, are slowly revealed; there is a cryptic, uncertain nature to them.  This is powerfully used as the story unfolds. But it can get confusing – reading an email on page 69 I suddenly wasn’t sure who had cancer (I worked it out). This isn’t a book which can be dipped in and out of while expecting to keep track.  It is better to be immersed in its images.

When I say images I mean both the photographs and the poetic imagery.  I enjoy the mixed-media elements of the book but the strongest images are created in the poems.  About her brother’s cancer treatment Elsie writes, ‘This is what they call burning down the house to get the mouse in the basement.’  Later she creates Ibiza with words – the people, flavours, scenery – and ends with ‘sunsets everyone claps for.’ Elsie remembers mountains ‘which bite the sky like a deathly incisor.’  My mind can see these teethy mountains extending into the sky just as I can look at the photograph of a mountain on page 40.

Aspiring Daybook is experimental, adventurous and narrative.  It’s mixed-media and mysterious. And it’s the kind of thing I love; I’m predisposed to like this work.  If you like experimental narratives or mixed-media storytelling than I think you too will find it’s a wonderful, moving, surprising read.